CIA Director’s AOL Account was Hacked

It seems ironic that the head of a government agency famous for hacking into private accounts of its citizens is himself hacked. I wonder how he now feels about strangers hacking into his personal email account? Does he, too, feel violated?

U.S. authorities have arrested two North Carolina men accused of hacking into the private email accounts of high-ranking U.S. intelligence officials, including the private email accounts of CIA Director John Brennan and Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. The North Carolina men will be extradited next week to Alexandria, where federal prosecutors for the Eastern District of Virginia have spent months building a case against a group that calls itself Crackas With Attitude… Authorities say the group included three teenage boys being investigated in the United Kingdom.

According to U.S. officials familiar with the investigation, the group also hacked into the accounts of Mark Giuliano, a former FBI deputy director; Amy Hess, the FBI executive assistant director for science and technology; Gregory Mecher, who is married to White House communications director Jen Psaki; and Harold Rosenbaum, chief executive of CIA contractor Centra Technology.

Details may be found at https://goo.gl/3iz3gT.

2 thoughts on “CIA Director’s AOL Account was Hacked

  1. I worked for the Feds before, during and after 9/11 so this doesn’t surprise me in the least. I have zero confidence in the US government’s ability to protect itself in the digital realm. They simply duplicated the security theater of TSA in their computer system, rendering it difficult to use–impossible for some tasks vital to workers–and probably less secure since it totally failed to acknowledge the fact human beings were implementing their policies.

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  2. He’s an idiot for using AOL!
    Doesn’t he know the correct thing to do for senior government officials is to run your own email server?
    Far more secure.

    And he should not just worry about someone reading his emails; he should also be worried that no one will be sure if an email “from him” is really from him. The loss of authenticity is also a danger.

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