Why Any Backdoor Would Be a Threat to Online Security

In regular intervals, Politicians demand that companies add backdoors to their end-to-end encrypted cloud services to enable law enforcements to easier persecute criminals. This demand ignores that any backdoor to encryption poses a severe threat to online security in general. An article in the Tutanota Blog explains why a backdoor is – and will always be – a stupid idea.

Check it out at: https://tutanota.com/blog/posts/why-a-backdoor-is-a-security-risk.

ProtonMail Hits 5 Million Accounts and Wants Users to Ditch Google by 2021

ProtonMail, the Geneva, Switzerland-based encrypted email service, “wants you to be able to completely de-Google-fy your life,” according to CEO Andy Yen. “Come to ProtonMail, and have all the features, plus the security and the privacy that Google doesn’t provide you. So, that’s our long-term vision.”

ProtonMail is primarily different from your free email — Gmail, Yahoo!, etc. — because it encrypts your message and can’t scrape them for data. That encryption also protects them from being read by third-parties if you send an email from your ProtonMail account to another ProtonMail user. But what about encrypted docs, spreadsheets, and slideshow presentations? That’s coming, too, Yen says.

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Wasabi: the New, Low Cost Cloud Storage Service

Wasabi is a brand-new cloud storage service. The company is so new that not all the planned “bells and whistles” are yet available. However, the present implementation hows a great deal of promise. In short, Wasabi appears to be perfect for Macintosh and Windows users looking for a simple way to use cloud storage at very low prices.

I signed up for Wasabi a few hours ago and, so far, it seems to work well. I am using Wasabi in the same manner as an external disk drive. Installation and operation was simple. If I do encounter problems with Wasabi in the future, I will publish a follow-up article at that time.

The most obvious advantage of Wasabi is the price: $.0049 per gigabyte/month which equals $4.99 per terabyte/month (all prices are in US dollars).

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Zello Walkie Talkie: Why App Downloads Are Soaring Ahead of Hurricane Florence

Are you facing a hurricane in your area? Or do you want to be able to communicate with friends and/or relatives during a hurricane and soon after? If so, read Zello Walkie Talkie: Why App Downloads Are Soaring Ahead of Hurricane Florence in the Yahoo web site at: https://yhoo.it/2p3WBTM.

You can also read my previous articles about Zello by starting at: https://privacyblog.com/?s=zello.

Microsoft to ‘warn’ Windows 10 Users not to Install Chrome or Firefox

The next update to Windows 10, to be released in October, is expected to “warn” users to never install Microsoft’s biggest web browser competitors: Chrome or Firefox. The pop-up message reportedly says that these two big-time competitor are not as safe and secure as Microsoft’s own Edge browser.

Don’t believe it. Experience has shown the opposite to be true: Both Chrome and Firefox have proven to be more secure than Microsoft’s Edge web browser. Microsoft apparently is weary of their customers switching to more secure web browsers created by other companies and is not against generating misleading FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) about the competitors.

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How to use Zello, the Walkie-Talkie App people are Downloading Ahead of Hurricane Florence

If Hurricane Florence is coming to your area, you need to download Zello in your smartphone. Details may be found in an article by Avery Hartmans in the Business Insider web site at: https://read.bi/2OgeBFG.

Also, see the earlier articles about Zello published here in the PrivacyBlog by starting at: https://privacyblog.com/?s=zello.

Free Municipal Wi-Fi May Be the Next Front In the War Against Privacy

According to an article in TheIntercept web site, free municipal wi-fi may be spying on you and invading your privacy:

“LinkNYC kiosks have become a familiar eyesore to New Yorkers. Over 1,600 of these towering, nine-and-a-half-foot monoliths — their double-sided screens festooned with ads and fun facts — have been installed across the city since early 2016. Mayor Bill de Blasio has celebrated their ability to provide “the fastest and largest municipal Wi-Fi network in the world” as “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city for every New Yorker, in every borough.” Anyone can use the kiosks’ Android tablets to search for directions and services; they are also equipped with charging stations, 911 buttons, and phones for free domestic calls.

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