Privacy International Lodges Complaints Against Seven Firms for Breaching Data Protection

Acxion, Oracle, Criteo, Quantcast, Tapad, Equifax, and Experian are all in Privacy International’s sights, with the organisation filing complaints in the UK, Ireland and France, urging data protection authorities to look into what it alleges is the “mass exploitation” of individuals’ data.

Details may be found in an article by Roland Moore-Colyer in The Inquirer at: http://bit.ly/2Dg4kX0.

Thousands of Swedes Are Inserting Microchips Under Their Skin

In Sweden, a country rich with technological advancement, thousands have had microchips inserted into their hands. The chips are designed to speed up users’ daily routines and make their lives more convenient — accessing their homes, offices and gyms is as easy as swiping their hands against digital readers. They also can be used to store emergency contact details, social media profiles or e-tickets for events and rail journeys within Sweden. Proponents of the tiny chips say they’re safe and largely protected from hacking, but one scientist is raising privacy concerns around the kind of personal health data that might be stored on the devices.

I think I would be more concerned about the tiny chips being used to track my every movement, recording where I have been, and even recording the people I probably talked with (if they also have embedded microchips so that two or more microchips in one location simultaneously can be considered to be a meeting).

Details about this scary technology may be found on the NPR web site at: https://n.pr/2yA0XXS.

Big Brother is Being Increasingly Outsourced

The federal and local governments have long relied on private companies for defense and law enforcement technologies. However, the governments are now expanding beyond past practices. Corporations are now expanding their paid spying performed for government agencies, both in online and offline spying. From a report:

“The … thing that was shocking for me was to understand just how the federal authorizations are allowing Amazon to have such a monopoly over the storage of government information,” says Jacinta Gonzalez, field organizer for immigrant advocacy group Mijente. Along with the National Immigration Project and the Immigrant Defense Project, Mijente funded a new report entitled, Who’s Behind ICE?: The Tech and Data Companies Fueling Deportations. Its findings are based on documents such as contracts, memoranda, and corporate financial reports –which are publicly available but take a lot of digging to decipher.

You can read more in an article by Sean Captain in the FastCompany web site at: http://bit.ly/2PTq5j1.

This Artificial Intelligence can Search for People by Height, Gender, and Clothing in Surveillance Videos

This is scary!

A team of AI researchers from India developed a tool to search for people in surveillance footage by height, clothing color, and gender. It’s like a search engine that can find people in a video.

Basically, you can tell this AI some details about the person you’re looking for and it’ll scour whatever video you give it. For example, a request for “females wearing red shirts who are 153 cm tall” would, potentially, narrow down an entire video clip to just frames featuring people who meet that criteria.

You can read more in an article by Tristan Greene in The Next Web at: http://bit.ly/2ShLXGy.

Pentagon Reveals Cyber Breach of Travel Records

The Pentagon on Friday said there has been a cyber breach of Defense Department travel records that compromised the personal information and credit card data of U.S. military and civilian personnel. According to a U.S. official familiar with the matter, the breach could have affected as many as 30,000 workers, but that number may grow as the investigation continues.

Details may be found in an article by Lolita C. Baldor in the Associated Press web site at: http://apnews.com/7f6f4db35b0041bdbc5467848225e67d.

Divorce after Cheating Wife snapped on Google Maps

The moral of this story: when you are out in public, don’t expect any privacy.

Google Maps has sparked a divorce, after a husband discovered his wife in intimate photos with another man online. The husband got a nasty shock while planning a trip, when he saw his wife on a bench stroking the hair of another man – with the other man’s head in the lap of the wife.

You can read more and see the Google Maps image at: http://bit.ly/2C9oTE4.