Microsoft to ‘warn’ Windows 10 Users not to Install Chrome or Firefox

The next update to Windows 10, to be released in October, is expected to “warn” users to never install Microsoft’s biggest web browser competitors: Chrome or Firefox. The pop-up message reportedly says that these two big-time competitor are not as safe and secure as Microsoft’s own Edge browser.

Don’t believe it. Experience has shown the opposite to be true: Both Chrome and Firefox have proven to be more secure than Microsoft’s Edge web browser. Microsoft apparently is weary of their customers switching to more secure web browsers created by other companies and is not against generating misleading FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) about the competitors.

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Tor Browser 8.0 is Released

Tor is probably the best-known privacy network and also one of the best at protecting your personal data. It is free software for enabling anonymous communication.

According to Wikipedia:

The name is derived from an acronym for the original software project name “The Onion Router”. Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user’s location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Using Tor makes it more difficult to trace Internet activity to the user: this includes “visits to Web sites, online posts, instant messages, and other communication forms”. Tor’s intended use is to protect the personal privacy of its users, as well as their freedom and ability to conduct confidential communication by keeping their Internet activities from being monitored.

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With the Next Version of Microsoft Windows, Say Goodbye To Your Windows PC As You Know It

Huge changes are coming from Microsoft. A new rumor is going around that claims Microsoft is switching from SELLING Windows to RENTING it instead. Some users think it will be an improvement while others believe it will be a major step backwards to computing in the way it was done in the 1970s when very expensive mainframes did all the computing and all data input and output by humans was done by using remote “dumb terminals.”

Microsoft is getting ready to replace Windows 10 with the Microsoft Managed Desktop. This will be a “desktop-as-a-service” (DaaS) offering. Instead of owning your own copy of Windows, you’ll “rent” Windows by the month. Microsoft already does this with Microsoft Office 365. Other companies, notably Adobe, also have software rental models, replacing the old concept of purchased software.

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Which Backup Products Are Good Ones?

In my recent article, US Hospital Pays $55,000 to Hackers after Ransomware Attack, I referred to “all good backup products.” That obviously leads to the question, “Which backup products are good ones?” I do not have a list of all good backup products for all operating systems, especially for those that are designed for use in large data processing centers. I am sure there must be dozens of such products. However, here are a few good ones I am aware of:

TimeMachine included free with every Macintosh computer. If you use a Macintosh, you need to be running TimeMachine! See https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201250

Arq for Windows and Macintosh systems: https://www.arqbackup.com/

Acronis makes backup software for many operating systems, including Windows, Macintosh, Linux, Windows Server products, VMware, and more: https://www.acronis.com/en-us/

BounceBack for Windows: https://cmsproducts.com/bounceback-backup-software/

CloudBerry Backup for Windows desktop and laptop systems as well as versions for IT service providers: https://www.cloudberrylab.com/

Veritas System Recovery for Windows or Linux: https://www.veritas.com/product/backup-and-recovery/system-recovery

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How You Can Protect Your Secrets with Encryption

News stories over the past few years about the unconstitutional actions of the National Security Agency (NSA) and other government agencies should serve as a wake-up call for all of us. Yes, there are many people and organizations trying to obtain information about you. From hackers in third-world countries, to companies trying to sell you products, to semi-secret agencies of the U.S. Government, it seems as if nearly everyone is trying to find information about you. Indeed, many people seem to have a phobia about storing their personal information on servers on the Internet.

What saddens me most of all is that the entire issue is so easily avoided: encrypt the information. When you leave your house, I suspect you lock the door. When you leave your automobile in a parking lot, you probably lock it up, too. The same should be true with your information. When you leave your information unattended, whether it is in your home when you are not present or someplace in the cloud, you should lock it up.

Simply put, encryption programs scramble data within the file or files that you specify so that no one else can access that data without the key that you keep. If anyone does manage to obtain a copy of your file, all they will see is something that looks similar to this:

lj,Rn’G9%$#ho\mG{njbhdmnRle=iuwHdwk|,mfmn~jJYle

Security is under your control at all times because you have the key and you decide who gets copies of that key. Encryption is easy to do, requiring only a few seconds, and (in many cases) it is free of charge.

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Vivaldi – A Privacy Oriented Web Browser

Today’s world is already comparable to George Orwell’s dystopian novel ‘1984’, since “everyone is being followed and everyone’s information is being collected.” Lack of awareness of the amount of data harvested online is “a perfect storm of a really bad idea,” according to Jon von Tetzchner. He said he was increasingly concerned about data collection and tracking by tech giants like Google and Facebook. He wants to change that.

von Tetzchner is the creator of Opera, the well-known web browser. Now he has a new project. Yes, he’s creating a web browser again. However, this one promises to be very different from Opera. He has since launched Vivaldi, which includes functions he says bigger browsers lack. Vivaldi.net does not track searches and is based on an online community of users who recommend features, he said. It also offers a million ways to customize everything.

You can learn more about the Vivaldi web browser and even try it for yourself at: https://vivaldi.com.