Privacy Blog

“By continuing the process of inflation, governments can confiscate secretly and unobserved an important part of the wealth of their citizens.” – John Maynard Keynes, writing about the effects of a seemingly small amount of inflation every year.

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Thanks to Facebook, Your Cellphone Company Is Watching You More Closely Than Ever

Offered to select Facebook partners, the data includes not just technical information about Facebook members’ devices and use of Wi-Fi and cellular networks, but also their past locations, interests, and even their social groups. This data is sourced not just from the company’s main iOS and Android apps, but from Instagram and Messenger as well. The data has been used by Facebook partners to assess their standing against competitors, including […]

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Angry Birds and the End of Privacy

“A Pew study published this January found that 76 percent of Americans knew basically nothing about Facebook’s tracking and targeting policies, even though other research shows that most people understand that they shouldn’t trust the company. (Researchers at Georgetown University and NYU recently named it one of the least trusted American institutions, across political parties.) If the tactics of even the largest, most public, most well-documented violator of our privacy […]

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Reclaim Your Privacy with These Privacy-Focused Alternatives to Google’s Services

If you’d prefer not to have a corporation and all its buddies breathing down your neck, consider these privacy-focused alternatives to Google’s services. Alternatives for Google Chrome, Google Search, Google Docs, Google Drive, Google Calendar, Google Photos, Google Translate, YouTube, Google Maps, and Gmail may be found in an article by Alexander Fox in the MakeTechEasier web site at: https://www.maketecheasier.com/google-services-alternatives-2/.

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Google Experiment Tests Top 5 Browsers, Finds Safari Riddled With Security Bugs

Bleeping Computer reports that Google engineer Ivan Fratric ran security tests on the 5 most popular web browsers. The test found 17 security bugs in Safari’s DOM engine, the worst of any of the 5 web browsers tested. NOTE: “DOM” stands for Document Object Model, a platform and language-neutral interface that will allow programs and scripts to dynamically access and update the content, structure and style of documents. A “DOM […]

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New Twitter Policy Abandons a Longstanding Privacy Pledge

According to an article by Jacob Hoffman-Andrews in the Electronic Frontier Foundation web site: Twitter plans to roll out a new privacy policy on June 18, and, with it, is promising to roll back its longstanding commitment to obey the Do Not Track (DNT) browser privacy setting. Instead, the company is switching to the Digital Advertising Alliance’s toothless and broken self-regulatory program. At the same time, the company is taking […]

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WikiLeaks Reveals Grasshopper, the CIA’s Windows Hacking Tool

Are you reading this on a Windows computer? If so, you may be sharing the information with the CIA, even if you are outside the United States and even if you are using a VPN, Tor, or other encrypted connection. WikiLeaks released new information concerning a CIA malware program called “Grasshopper,” that specifically targets Windows. The Grasshopper framework was (is?) allegedly used by the CIA to make custom malware payloads. […]

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Security Professionals Scoff at Trump’s Position on Privacy

Attendants of this year’s RSA Conference—an event drawing thousands of digital security professionals, cryptographers, engineers, as well as tech companies and intelligence agencies looking to recruit—expressed skepticism of President Trump’s commitment to privacy. Details may be found in an article by Rebecca Jeschke And Rainey Reitman in the Electronic Freedom Foundation web site at: http://bit.ly/2oKOHkd.

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