Privacy Blog

"Friends don’t let friends get spied on.' – Richard Stallman, President of the Free Software Foundation and longtime advocate of privacy in technology.

Backdoor Accounts Discovered in 29 FTTH Devices from Chinese Vendor C-Data

Here is another argument in favor of encryption without any “back doors”: In a report published this week, security researchers Pierre Kim and Alexandre Torres said they discovered seven vulnerabilities in the firmware of FTTH OLT devices manufactured by Chinese equipment vendor C-Data. Kim and Torres said they confirmed the vulnerabilities by analyzing the latest firmware running on two devices, but they believe that the same vulnerabilities impact 27 other […]

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Kinda Sorta Weakened Version of EARN IT Act Creeps Closer

The EARN It Act currently being debated in the US Senate promises to combat the scourge of online child sex abuse materials. But is it really just a thinly-veiled attack by government on privacy and end-to-end encryption? Most privacy experts believe the second possibility is the true intent of the proposed piece of legislation. The true purpose of the  EARN It Act is an attack by the U.S. government on […]

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Federal Judge Rejects Much of Legal Challenge to Maine Internet Privacy Law

A federal judge has rejected much of a legal challenge to Maine’s internet privacy law. The law, which just took effect on July 1, requires internet service providers to get consumers’ consent before using or sharing their internet-use data. Four internet industry groups representing internet service providers and led by a Pennsylvania-based trade group called ACA Connects sued in February seeking to block the law, which sets some of the […]

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Florida Becomes First State to Enact DNA Privacy Law, Blocking Insurers From Genetic Data

Florida on Wednesday became the nation’s first state to enact a DNA privacy law, prohibiting life, disability and long-term care insurance companies from using genetic tests for coverage purposes. Gov. Ron DeSantis signed House Bill 1189, sponsored by Rep. Chris Sprowls, R-Palm Harbor. It <strong>extends federal prohibitions</strong> against health insurance providers accessing results from DNA tests, such as those offered by 23andMe or AncestryDNA, to the three other insurers. Sprowls, […]

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New ThiefQuest Ransomware Discovered Targeting macOS Users

Macs seem to have fewer problems with viruses, ransomware, and other forms of malware. However, the new ThiefQuest ransomware seems to be very bad and also very difficult to remove. You can read more in an article by Lily Hay Newman in the Wired web site at: https://www.wired.com/story/new-mac-ransomware-thiefquest-evilquest/. In the article, please note the statement “Though ThiefQuest is packed with menacing features, it’s unlikely to infect your Mac anytime soon […]

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Detroit Police Chief admits Facial Recognition Software Misidentifies 96% of the Time

Detroit police have used highly unreliable facial recognition technology almost exclusively against Black people so far in 2020, according to the Detroit Police Department’s own statistics. Detroit Police Chief James Craig admitted: “If we would use the software only [to identify subjects], we would not solve the case 95-97 percent of the time,” Craig said. “That’s if we relied totally on the software, which would be against our current policy … […]

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The Most Important Privacy Case You’ve Never Heard Of

“One of the most important privacy cases you’ve never heard of is being litigated right now in a federal district court in Maine. ACA v. Frey is a challenge by the nation’s largest broadband Internet access providers to a Maine law that protects the privacy of the state’s broadband Internet users. If the broadband providers prevail, this case could eliminate sector-specific privacy laws across the nation, foreclose national privacy legislation, […]

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Blockchain Can Provide the Right to Privacy That Everyone Deserves

Reuben Yap has just published an article that I believe everyone should read, especially our elected representatives. He writes (in part): “Contrary to popular belief, privacy is not for those with something to hide but with everything to lose. Authoritarian governments across the globe are increasingly using surveillance to control their citizens at the expense of personal freedoms and civil liberties. The privacy of one’s financial transactions is intricately linked […]

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Under This New Law, Cryptocurrency Could Become Illegal

I wrote about an absurd proposed piece of legislation 5 days ago at https://bit.ly/2VwfKhN. If passed, a new bill under consideration in the U.S. Senate will destroy personal, corporate, and most other private online communications. It will be a gift to credit card thieves, identity thieves, Facebook’s advertisers, as well as to local and foreign governments alike. In short, the bill proposes requiring “back doors” in all encrypted communications created […]

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CryptPad: a Privacy-Focused Collaborative Online Office Suite with Chat

If you or your family or your team at work need privacy and security, you might want to check out CryptPad. CryptPad is a privacy protecting alternative to Google Docs, Microsoft Office Online, and other online office suites. And while protecting privacy, it still allows for real-time collaboration between creative partners. Yes, you can (optionally) share your documents with others. The suite includes rich text (like a word processor), presentation, […]

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