Privacy Blog

"Friends don’t let friends get spied on.' – Richard Stallman, President of the Free Software Foundation and longtime advocate of privacy in technology.

Offline Privacy & Security

We Must Stop Smiling Our Way Towards A Surveillance State

If you are not concerned with facial recognition and its related privacy issues because you believe you have nothing to hide, you NEED to read Steve Ranger’s article in ZDNet: https://www.zdnet.com/article/we-must-stop-smiling-our-way-towards-a-surveillance-state/. “For sure, these technologies can have many benefits, from making it quicker to unlock your phone or recognising criminals in the street. But allowing these technologies to become pervasive without rigorous debate about the need for them, the effectiveness […]

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California Governor Signs Bill Banning Facial Recognition Tech Use By State’s Law Enforcement Agencies

From an article by Tim Cushing in the TechDirt web site: “Building on San Francisco’s first-of-its-kind ban on government face recognition, California this week enacted a landmark law that blocks police from using body cameras for spying on the public. “The state-wide law keeps thousands of body cameras used by police officers from being transformed into roving surveillance devices that track our faces, voices, and even the unique way we walk. Importantly, […]

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Edward Snowden said: ‘Without Encryption, We Will Lose All Privacy. This is Our New Battleground’

This statement clearly states why encryption is important to everyone, private citizens, public officials, sports figures, celebrities, and everyone else alike: “… in the midst of the greatest computer security crisis in history, the US government, along with the governments of the UK and Australia, is attempting to undermine the only method that currently exists for reliably protecting the world’s information: encryption. Should they succeed in their quest to undermine […]

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“I’d recognize that face from my extensive database anywhere!”

Governments are using facial-recognition technology in more ways—and prompting more concerns about privacy and fairness. Ellis Rosen created a cartoon that is available cartooncollections.com that summarizes one of the biggest privacy concerns of today. Because of copyright regulations, I cannot publish the cartoon here but I can legally tell you how you can view it. Click here: https://media.wired.com/photos/5d8a883075be39000827d6df/master/w_1600%2Cc_limit/20191008-rosen-total-recall.jpg

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How to Easily Identify a Would-be car Thief: Install a DashCam

Beaverton, Oregon police know exactly what one car prowler suspect looks like, thanks to a dashcam that caught him in the act. The woman whose dashcam recorded the crime noticed one of her car’s doors was hanging wide open on Friday morning. Prowlers appeared to have spent the previous night combing the parking lot, looking for unlocked cars. The woman’s Owlcam motion-activated dashcam caught one prowler completely by surprise, as […]

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China’s “Super Camera” Can Spot You in a Crowd of Thousands

You can run but you cannot hide from China’s new “Super Camera”! As ABC News reports, the new camera system is being referred to as a “Super Camera” due to the detail it can capture. Developed by Fudan University in conjunction with the Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, the camera is 500 megapixels, meaning it can be positioned in a stadium packed […]

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Privacy in a Digital World

The intensive collection of data and the inherent advantages of the new technology have spawned the cynical idea that privacy is dead, and we might as well just get used to that fact. However, Tehilla-Shwartz Altshuler disagrees. Tehilla is a Senior Fellow and head of the Democracy in the Information Age Program at the Israel Democracy Institute. In an article in the TechCrunch web site, Tehilla describes three aspects of […]

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